A randomised controlled trial for an internet based smoking cessation intervention

Description

We designed an Automated Randomised Controlled Trial from May 2010-until October 2012. The setting was a multi component Norwegian Internet-based tailored smoking cessation intervention comparing two ehealth methods. At the time of the study 94% of the adult population had access to Internet in their homes and 96% owned a mobile phone. The overall smoking prevalence declined with 3% in Norway during the study period. We recruited participants 4,335 smokers, 16 years and older, through an open, free governmental Internet site in Norway.

The results find that at 6 months, the response rate was 21.1% in the text message arm and 18.6% in the email arm (not statistically different). At 6 months, the reported quit rate was 11.5% in the text message and 11% in the email arm (OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.86-1.30).

Goals

To assess the efficiency of an Internet-based tailored smoking cessation intervention delivered by mobile phone text messages versus emails, in a real-world setting.

To assess predictors for successful smoking cessation for an intervention delivered by mobile phone text messages or emails.

Method

We recruited participants continuously, so the number of participants varied at each time point. We did not offer Nicotine Replacement Therapy, cessation medication, prizes to participate or biochemically verification of smoking cessation. We compared the two arms, using an intention-to-treat analysis. The interventions were tailored smoking cessation advice delivered by mobile phone text messages versus emails. Primary and secondary outome measures were adherence and seven-days self-reported point-prevalence abstinence at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post cessation.

Conclusion

We recruited participants continuously, so the number of participants varied at each time point. We did not offer Nicotine Replacement Therapy, cessation medication, prizes to participate or biochemically verification of smoking cessation. We compared the two arms, using an intention-to-treat analysis. The interventions were tailored smoking cessation advice delivered by mobile phone text messages versus emails. Primary and secondary outome measures were adherence and seven-days self-reported point-prevalence abstinence at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post cessation.

Project manager

Inger Torhild Gram Inger Torhild Gram

Project participant

External project participants

  • Silje C. Wangberg,
  • Dillys Larbi,

Project partners

Financing

Northern Norway Regional Health Authority

Theme

Citizen services

Project period

2008 - 2016

Last updated

21 March 2019