Safety first with e-medicine management


The goal is to make patient care safer and more effective, say researchers at the Norwegian Centre for E-health Research. They are looking at how medicine management is performed today and at the national e-solutions, to see how they could be improved.

Doing research on e-medicine management, from left: Catherine Pope (University of Southampton), Thomas Schopf, Line Lundvoll Warth, Stein Olav Skrøvseth, Kari Dyb, Monika Johansen – all from the Norwegian Centre for E-health Research. Photo: Lene Lundberg
Doing research on e-medicine management, from left: Catherine Pope (University of Southampton), Thomas Schopf, Line Lundvoll Warth, Stein Olav Skrøvseth, Kari Dyb, Monika Johansen – all from the Norwegian Centre for E-health Research. Photo: Lene Lundberg

One wrong dose of medicine can be lethal, or damage a person’s health. In the world of pharmacology, there is not much room for mistakes. Health care professionals learn the “five rights” in school: Giving the right medicine to the right person, at the right dose, by the right route and at the right time.

– Despite this, errors happen, and the result can be adverse reactions, overdose or death. That is why it is important to do more research in the field of e-medicine management. We must find out how digital solutions can support health care and services better, says Monika Johansen, head of the Future Health Record department at the Norwegian Centre for E-health Research.

Collaboration with Catherine Pope

The e-health researcher community in Norway recently got a new team member, from overseas. Catherine Pope, Professor of Medical Sociology at the University of Southampton, now holds a part-time position at the Norwegian Centre for E-health Research. In her position at the University of Southampton, Catherine leads Emergency and Urgent Care research in Health Sciences. Her research examines health care work and the organisation and delivery of health services in the UK.

Why do we need to do research on this – e-medication?

– This is an area where we use digital technologies, designed to make patient care safer. This might save time and save money, might make health care professionals work differently, and we need to know how the e-health solutions are used and whether they are effective, says Catherine.

A win-win situation

Co-operating on research across Norway and the UK will benefit both countries.

– I am really excited. This will be shared work that I hope we can all use, says Catherine.

– It is great to get her perspectives and input, she has long and solid experience in this field, says Monika Johansen.

Director Stein Olav Skrøvseth is also positive.

– E-health research is global and we need to learn from each other. We want to reach out and make as many friends as possible within the field, both nationally and internationally. We look forward to working with Catherine Pope, he says.